In 1993 BranScan Ltd was founded, to design a system that could measure Bran specks in flour. The original concept of measuring bran specks in flour came from a group of millers, their idea was to create a new way of measuring the quality of flour accuratley and consitently without having to resort to the ASH value, as in the UK this could not be used due to the addition of calcium into the flour.

New Online fluoroscan system
Old bottom loading Branscan 2000

The first system developed was the BranScan 1000 in-line speck measurement system. Quickly adopted by flour mills around the world to monitor flour quality in real time. The method of capturing the sample was and still is unique and insures that the sample is collected in the same way every time, this means that the miller has confidence in the results show on the display in the control room.

Branscan 1000

The second system to be developed was the BranScan 2000, a bottom loader system that displayed all of the same data as the BranScan 1000 system, but designed to be used "at line" or in the laboratory. These systems were quickly adopted for use by many mills to insure quality of the flour being produce, and also as a check method for the inline Branscan 1000

In 2003 BranScan launched the new Fluoroscan, which replaced the original BranScan instruments. Fluoroscan measures the mineral content of flour (Bran and Aleurone) and as such provides an accurate ASH reading to within +/- 0.2 to reference (reference being furnace method).

A new laboratory instrument was also launched at the same time featuring a much more user friendly top loading method, and with an all new user friendly software interface it has become one of the quickest and most accurate laboratory ASH measurement systems available.


Fluoroscan F2000

An updated version of the In-line BranScan 1000 was also released, however the orignial well proven sampling method was kept the same.

Due to this unique sampling ability in 2010 an NIR was added to the system, follwing the basic principle of NIR, the flour is collected and measured the same way each and every time. This means that the accuracy and repeatability is greatly improved over systems that measure on a falling or moving sample.

Click Here for

Application Notes